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In Norway, children born into low socio-economic backgrounds face a higher risk of becoming NEET in their youth ...

„In Norway, children born into low socio-economic backgrounds face a higher risk of becoming NEET in their youth. Young people whose mother did not have an uppersecondary education are more than twice as likely to be NEET as the children of tertiary educated mothers. This effect is strongest for 15-19 year-olds, indicating a particularly strong effect of parental education on upper-secondary school drop-out.“

OECD (Hrsg.), „Investing in Youth: Norway“ (2018), S. 44

 

Norwegen: Disadvantage for young people with parents who were not gainfully employed ...

Norwegen: „Having grown-up in a household with parents who were not gainfully employed puts young people at a disadvantage – those whose father was not working when they were 16 years old are twice as likely to be NEET as those whose father was working, a somewhat bigger cleavage than in Germany.“

OECD (Hrsg.), „Investing in Youth: Norway“ (2018), S. 44f

 

Norwegen: Those with mental health problems are largely excluded from a well-performing labour market ...

Norwegen: „The gap in unemployment between those who do and those who do not suffer from mental disorders is highest in Norway, and a high share of the jobless receive sickness or disability supports, indicating that those with mental health problems are largely excluded from a well-performing labour market.“

OECD (Hrsg.), „Investing in Youth: Norway“ (2018), S. 45

 

NEETs in Norway report significantly lower life satisfaction than other young people ...

„NEETs in Norway report significantly lower life satisfaction than other young people, and are much more likely to suffer from poor mental health indicated by self-reported anxiety and depression. Four-out-of-ten NEETs reported low life satisfaction, a share that is four times higher than among young people who study or work – a much bigger gap than in the EU on average, where NEETs are only twice as likely to be unsatisfied with their lives as other young people.“

OECD (Hrsg.), „Investing in Youth: Norway“ (2018), S. 45

 

Norwegen: Expenditure on education from primary through to tertiary education is among the highest in the OECD ...

Norwegen: „Funding is generous: overall expenditure on education from primary through to tertiary education is among the highest in the OECD.“

OECD (Hrsg.), „Investing in Youth: Norway“ (2018), S. 89

 

Norwegen: Pupils who do not, or cannot, benefit from mainstream education because of learning difficulties or other impairments have a right to special-needs education following a professional assessment ...

Norwegen: „Pupils who do not, or cannot, benefit from mainstream education because of learning difficulties or other impairments have a right to special-needs education following a professional assessment. Special-needs education is provided in kindergartens and at all levels of schooling, including VET.“

OECD (Hrsg.), „Investing in Youth: Norway“ (2018), S. 92

 

In keinem anderen Land hängt der Schulerfolg so sehr vom Bildungsniveau der Eltern ab wie im Gesamtschulstaat Norwegen ...

„Young people whose parents do not have upper-secondary education are less likely to graduate themselves in all countries for which data are available. In Norway, however, only half of them achieve an upper-secondary degree within five years, compared to 56 % in Sweden and 57 % in Finland. The gap between the completion rates of the children of tertiary and lower-secondary educated parents is higher than in any other country for which data are available.“

OECD (Hrsg.), „Investing in Youth: Norway“ (2018), S. 94f

 

Abschlussquoten der Sekundarstufe II höchst unterschiedlich ...

„Der Unterschied bei den Erfolgsquoten zwischen Schülern ohne Migrationshintergrund und Schülern mit Migrationshintergrund der ersten Generation beträgt in Finnland, den Niederlanden, Norwegen und Schweden mehr als 10 Prozentpunkte – obwohl weniger als 5 Prozent der Anfängerkohorte in Finnland einen Migrationshintergrund der ersten Generation aufweisen.“

OECD (Hrsg.), „Bildung auf einen Blick 2017“ (2017), S. 192

 

In Oslo, children aged seven and upwards are offered initial welcoming classes before entering mainstream education ...

Oslo: „In Oslo, children aged seven and upwards are offered initial welcoming classes before entering mainstream education. Different welcoming classes are offered based on a child’s need for language training. Some children spend up to two years in the welcoming classes, while others might only spend several months.“

Eurocities (Hrsg.), „Cities’ actions for the education of asylum seekers and refugees“ (2017), S. 10

 

In Oslo, refugees aged over 16 have a legal right and an obligation to complete a minimum of 600 hours of language training ...

Oslo: „In Oslo, refugees aged over 16 have a legal right and an obligation to complete a minimum of 600 hours of language training. If needed, they can have up to 3,000 hours of training. Asylum seekers are eligible for up to 175 hours of language training.“

Eurocities (Hrsg.), „Cities’ actions for the education of asylum seekers and refugees“ (2017), S. 12

 

Norway has generous funding at all levels of the education system ...

„Norway has generous funding at all levels of the education system. […] Expenditure on education institutions as a percentage of GDP (for all educational levels combined) is one of the highest among OECD countries.“

OECD (Hrsg.), „Education Policy Outlook 2015 – Making Reforms Happen“ (2015), S. 275

 

Admission to Norwegian universities is a complicated process, partly dependent on grades ...

Norwegen: „Admission to Norwegian universities is a complicated process, partly dependent on grades. Students who follow a general training path at the upper secondary school will take exams that lead to general university admission certification, called generell studiekompetanse. This diploma is a requirement to be admitted to universities, but it does not guarantee placement.“

Univ.-Prof. Dr. Marca Wolfensberger, „Talent Development in European Higher Education“ (2015), S. 129

 

In Österreich kommt auf 23 Lehrer eine administrative Arbeitskraft - in Norwegen ist das Verhältnis sieben zu eins ...

„In Österreich kommt auf 23 Lehrer eine administrative Arbeitskraft - in Norwegen ist das Verhältnis sieben zu eins. [...] Es gibt genug Aufgaben, für die man keine voll bezahlte Lehrkraft braucht, die viele Semester lang studiert hat.“

Univ.-Prof. Dr. Stefan Hopmann, Wiener Zeitung ONLINE am 25. Juni 2013

 

Norwegen: Betreuer, Ergotherapeuten und Psychologen an den Schulen ...

„In Norwegen sind ein Drittel aller in Schulen Beschäftigten keine Lehrer, das geht von Betreuern über Ergotherapeuten bis hin zu Psychologen.“

Univ.-Prof. Dr. Stefan Hopmann, Der Standard ONLINE am 12. Juni 2013

 

Trend towards the use of special placements for children who are judged to be particularly challenging ...

„In Norway, which has for many years promoted inclusive education, there is a trend towards the use of special placements for children who are judged to be particularly challenging.“

NESSE (Hrsg.), „Education and Disabilty/Special Needs“ (2012), S. 21

 

The Norwegian labour market seems to place much emphasis on full mastery of the Norwegian language ...

„The Norwegian labour market seems to place much emphasis on full mastery of the Norwegian language and indeed, Norway invests significant amounts in providing language training.“

OECD (Hrsg.), „Jobs for Immigrants“ (2012), S. 38

 

Unterstützung für Eltern, die ihre Berufstätigkeit unterbrechen ...

„In all of the Nordic countries, parents who make use of maternity, paternity or parental leave receive a relatively high compensation for loss of income during leave.“

Dr. Ann-Zofie Duvander u. a., „Parental leave“. In: Gíslason u. a., „Parental leave, childcare and gender equality in the Nordic countries“ (2011), S. 32

 

Norway’s annual expense per student ...

„Norway’s annual expense per student is about 45 % above the OECD average.“

OECD (Hrsg.), „Reviews of Evaluation and Assessment in Education – Norway“ (2011), S. 18

 

Norwegen: Sprachtraining für Eltern mit Migrationshintergrund ...

„Norway combines Norwegian language training for immigrant parents with open access to kindergartens.“

OECD (Hrsg.), „Starting Strong III“ (2011), S. 264

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Length of school-to-work transition ...

„The length of school-to-work transition in Iceland, Italy and Norway is over three years.“

Cedefop (Hrsg.), „Guiding at-risk youth through learning to work: Lessons from across Europe“ (2010), S. 30

 

In Norway, children’s language development is assessed at age four ...

„In Norway, children’s language development is assessed at age four both in their mother language and Norwegian at health clinics.“

OECD (Hrsg.), „Closing the Gap for Immigrant Students“ (2010), S. 52